seesaw


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Seesaw \See"saw`\, n. [Probably a reduplication of saw, to
   express the alternate motion to and fro, as in the act of
   sawing.]
   1. A play among children in which they are seated upon the
      opposite ends of a plank which is balanced in the middle,
      and move alternately up and down.
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   2. A plank or board adjusted for this play.
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   3. A vibratory or reciprocating motion.
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            He has been arguing in a circle; there is thus a
            seesaw between the hypothesis and fact. --Sir W.
                                                  Hamilton.
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   4. (Whist.) Same as Crossruff.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Seesaw \See"saw`\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Seesawad; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Seesawing.]
   To move with a reciprocating motion; to move backward and
   forward, or upward and downward.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Seesaw \See"saw`\, v. t.
   To cause to move backward and forward in seesaw fashion.
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         He seesaws himself to and fro.           --Ld. Lytton.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Seesaw \See"saw`\, a.
   Moving up and down, or to and fro; having a reciprocating
   motion.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Crossruff \Cross"ruff`\ (-r?f`), n. (Whist)
   The play in bridge or whist where partners trump each a
   different suit, and lead to each other for that purpose; --
   called also seesaw.
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