silver hake


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Silver \Sil"ver\, a.
   1. Of or pertaining to silver; made of silver; as, silver
      leaf; a silver cup.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Resembling silver. Specifically:
      (a) Bright; resplendent; white. "Silver hair." --Shak.
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                Others, on silver lakes and rivers, bathed
                Their downy breast.               --Milton.
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      (b) Precious; costly.
      (c) Giving a clear, ringing sound soft and clear. "Silver
          voices." --Spenser.
      (d) Sweet; gentle; peaceful. "Silver slumber." --Spenser.
          [1913 Webster]

   American silver fir (Bot.), the balsam fir. See under
      Balsam.

   Silver age (Roman Lit.), the latter part (a. d. 14-180) of
      the classical period of Latinity, -- the time of writers
      of inferior purity of language, as compared with those of
      the previous golden age, so-called.

   Silver-bell tree (Bot.), an American shrub or small tree
      (Halesia tetraptera) with white bell-shaped flowers in
      clusters or racemes; the snowdrop tree.

   Silver bush (Bot.), a shrubby leguminous plant ({Anthyllis
      Barba-Jovis}) of Southern Europe, having silvery foliage.
      

   Silver chub (Zool.), the fallfish.

   Silver eel. (Zool.)
      (a) The cutlass fish.
      (b) A pale variety of the common eel.

   Silver fir (Bot.), a coniferous tree (Abies pectinata)
      found in mountainous districts in the middle and south of
      Europe, where it often grows to the height of 100 or 150
      feet. It yields Burgundy pitch and Strasburg turpentine.
      

   Silver foil, foil made of silver.

   Silver fox (Zool.), a variety of the common fox ({Vulpes
      vulpes}, variety argenteus) found in the northern parts of
      Asia, Europe, and America. Its fur is nearly black, with
      silvery tips, and is highly valued. Called also {black
      fox}, and silver-gray fox.

   Silver gar. (Zool.) See Billfish
      (a) .

   Silver grain (Bot.), the lines or narrow plates of cellular
      tissue which pass from the pith to the bark of an
      exogenous stem; the medullary rays. In the wood of the oak
      they are much larger than in that of the beech, maple,
      pine, cherry, etc.

   Silver grebe (Zool.), the red-throated diver. See Illust.
      under Diver.

   Silver hake (Zool.), the American whiting.

   Silver leaf, leaves or sheets made of silver beaten very
      thin.

   Silver lunge (Zool.), the namaycush.

   Silver moonfish.(Zool.) See Moonfish
      (b) .

   Silver moth (Zool.), a lepisma.

   Silver owl (Zool.), the barn owl.

   Silver perch (Zool.), the mademoiselle, 2.

   Silver pheasant (Zool.), any one of several species of
      beautiful crested and long-tailed Asiatic pheasants, of
      the genus Euplocamus. They have the tail and more or
      less of the upper parts silvery white. The most common
      species (Euplocamus nychtemerus) is native of China.

   Silver plate,
      (a) domestic utensils made of a base metal coated with
          silver.
      (b) a plating of silver on a base metal.

   Silver plover (Zool.), the knot.

   Silver salmon (Zool.), a salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)
      native of both coasts of the North Pacific. It ascends all
      the American rivers as far south as the Sacramento. Called
      also kisutch, whitefish, and white salmon.

   Silver shell (Zool.), a marine bivalve of the genus Anomia.
      See Anomia.

   Silver steel, an alloy of steel with a very small
      proportion of silver.

   Silver stick, a title given to the title field officer of
      the Life Guards when on duty at the palace. [Eng.]
      --Thackeray.

   Silver tree (Bot.), a South African tree ({Leucadendron
      argenteum}) with long, silvery, silky leaves.

   Silver trout, (Zool.) See Trout.

   Silver wedding. See under Wedding.

   Silver whiting (Zool.), a marine sciaenoid food fish
      (Menticirrus littoralis) native of the Southern United
      States; -- called also surf whiting.

   Silver witch (Zool.), A lepisma.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiting \Whit"ing\, n. [From White.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. (Zool.)
      (a) A common European food fish (Melangus vulgaris) of
          the Codfish family; -- called also fittin.
      (b) A North American fish (Merlucius vulgaris) allied to
          the preceding; -- called also silver hake.
      (c) Any one of several species of North American marine
          sciaenoid food fishes belonging to genus
          Menticirrhus, especially Menticirrhus Americanus,
          found from Maryland to Brazil, and {Menticirrhus
          littoralis}, common from Virginia to Texas; -- called
          also silver whiting, and surf whiting.
          [1913 Webster]

   Note: Various other fishes are locally called whiting, as the
         kingfish
      (a), the sailor's choice
      (b), the Pacific tomcod, and certain species of lake
          whitefishes.
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   2. Chalk prepared in an impalpable powder by pulverizing and
      repeated washing, used as a pigment, as an ingredient in
      putty, for cleaning silver, etc.
      [1913 Webster]

   Whiting pollack. (Zool.) Same as Pollack.

   Whiting pout (Zool.), the bib, 2.
      [1913 Webster]
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