something


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Something \Some"thing\, n.
   1. Anything unknown, undetermined, or not specifically
      designated; a certain indefinite thing; an indeterminate
      or unknown event; an unspecified task, work, or thing.
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            There is something in the wind.       --Shak.
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            The whole world has something to do, something to
            talk of, something to wish for, and something to be
            employed about.                       --Pope.
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            Something attemped, something done,
            Has earned a night's repose.          --Longfellow.
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   2. A part; a portion, more or less; an indefinite quantity or
      degree; a little.
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            Something yet of doubt remains.       --Milton.
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            Something of it arises from our infant state. --I.
                                                  Watts.
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   3. A person or thing importance.
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            If a man thinketh himself to be something, when he
            is nothing, he deceiveth himself.     --Gal. vi. 3.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Something \Some"thing\, adv.
   In some degree; somewhat; to some extent; at some distance.
   --Shak.
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         I something fear my father's wrath.      --Shak.
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         We have something fairer play than a reasoner could
         have expected formerly.                  --Burke.
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         My sense of touch is something coarse.   --Tennyson.
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         It must be done to-night,
         And something from the palace.           --Shak.
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