submarine


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

hoagie \hoagie\, hoagy \hoagy\n.
   a large sandwich on a long crusty roll that is split
   lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and
   onion and lettuce and condiments); different names are used
   in different sections of the U. S., such as hero,
   grinder, and submarine.

   Syn: bomber, grinder, hero, hero sandwich, hoagie, Cuban
        sandwich, Italian sandwich, poor boy, sub, submarine,
        submarine sandwich, torpedo, wedge, zep.
        [WordNet 1.5]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Submarine \Sub*ma*rine"\, n.
   A submarine plant or animal.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Submarine \Sub`ma*rine"\, n.
   1. A submarine boat; a ship that can travel under the surface
      of the water. Most such ships are ships of war, as part of
      a navy, but submarines are also used for oceanic research.
      Also called sub and (from the German U-Boot) U-boat.
      esp., Nav., a submarine torpedo boat; -- called specif.
      submergible submarine when capable of operating at
      various depths and of traveling considerable distances
      under water, and submersible submarine when capable of
      being only partly submerged, i.e., so that the conning
      tower, etc., is still above water. The latter type and
      most of the former type are submerged as desired by
      regulating the amount of water admitted to the ballast
      tanks and sink on an even keel; some of the former type
      effect submersion while under way by means of horizontal
      rudders, in some cases also with admission of water to the
      ballast tanks.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

   2. A stowaway on a seagoing vessel. [Colloq.]
      [PJC]

   3. A submarine sandwich.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Submarine \Sub`ma*rine"\, a.
   Being, acting, or growing, under water in the sea; as,
   submarine navigators; submarine plants.
   [1913 Webster]

   Submarine armor, a waterproof dress of strong material,
      having a helmet into which air for breathing is pumped
      through a tube leading from above the surface to enable a
      diver to remain under water.

   Submarine cable. See Telegraph cable, under Telegraph.
      

   Submarine mine. See Torpedo, 2
   (a) .
       [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

submarine sandwich \sub`ma*rine" sand"wich\, n.
   A large sandwich on an elongated roll, usually incompletely
   cut into two halves, filed with various cold cuts, meatballs,
   lettuce, cheese, tomatoes, olives, etc., and spiced
   variously, and often having oil or other dressing applied;
   called also hoagie, hero, hero sandwich, grinder,
   sub, submarine, poor boy, and Italian sandwich. A
   single such sandwich may consitute a substantial meal. Very
   large variants are sometimes prepared for social gatherings
   and cut into pieces for individual consumption.
   [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Armor \Ar"mor\, n. [OE. armure, fr. F. armure, OF. armeure, fr.
   L. armatura. See Armature.] [Spelt also armour.]
   1. Defensive arms for the body; any clothing or covering worn
      to protect one's person in battle.
      [1913 Webster]

   Note: In English statues, armor is used for the whole
         apparatus of war, including offensive as well as
         defensive arms. The statues of armor directed what arms
         every man should provide.
         [1913 Webster]

   2. Steel or iron covering, whether of ships or forts,
      protecting them from the fire of artillery.
      [1913 Webster]

   Coat armor, the escutcheon of a person or family, with its
      several charges and other furniture, as mantling, crest,
      supporters, motto, etc.

   Submarine, a water-tight dress or covering for a diver. See
      under Submarine.
      [1913 Webster]
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