uniform


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Regulation \Reg`u*la"tion\ (-l?"sh?n), n.
   1. The act of regulating, or the state of being regulated.
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            The temper and regulation of our own minds.
                                                  --Macaulay.
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   2. A rule or order prescribed for management or government;
      prescription; a regulating principle; a governing
      direction; precept; law; as, the regulations of a society
      or a school.
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   Regulation sword, cap, uniform, etc. (Mil.), a sword,
      cap, uniform, etc., of the kind or quality prescribed by
      the official regulations.
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   Syn: Law; rule; method; principle; order; precept. See
        Law.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Uniform \U"ni*form\, n. [F. uniforme. See Uniform, a.]
   A dress of a particular style or fashion worn by persons in
   the same service or order by means of which they have a
   distinctive appearance; as, the uniform of the artillery, of
   the police, of the Freemasons, etc.
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         There are many things which, a soldier will do in his
         plain clothes which he scorns to do in his uniform.
                                                  --F. W.
                                                  Robertson.
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   In full uniform (Mil.), wearing the whole of the prescribed
      uniform, with ornaments, badges of rank, sash, side arms,
      etc.

   Uniform sword, an officer's sword of the regulation pattern
      prescribed for the army or navy.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Uniform \U"ni*form\, a. [L. uniformis; unus one + forma from:
   cf. F. uniforme.]
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   1. Having always the same form, manner, or degree; not
      varying or variable; unchanging; consistent; equable;
      homogenous; as, the dress of the Asiatics has been uniform
      from early ages; the temperature is uniform; a stratum of
      uniform clay. --Whewell.
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   2. Of the same form with others; agreeing with each other;
      conforming to one rule or mode; consonant.
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            The only doubt is . . . how far churches are bound
            to be uniform in their ceremonies.    --Hooker.
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   Uniform matter, that which is all of the same kind and
      texture; homogenous matter.

   Uniform motion, the motion of a body when it passes over
      equal spaces in equal times; equable motion. --Hutton.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Uniform \U"ni*form\, v. t.
   1. To clothe with a uniform; as, to uniform a company of
      soldiers.
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   2. To make conformable. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney.
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