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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Labial \La"bi*al\, n.
   1. (Phonetics) A letter or character representing an
      articulation or sound formed or uttered chiefly with the
      lips, as b, p, w.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Mus.) An organ pipe that is furnished with lips; a flue
      pipe.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Zool.) One of the scales which border the mouth of a fish
      or reptile.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

W \W\ (d[u^]b"'l [=u]),
   the twenty-third letter of the English alphabet, is usually a
   consonant, but sometimes it is a vowel, forming the second
   element of certain diphthongs, as in few, how. It takes its
   written form and its name from the repetition of a V, this
   being the original form of the Roman capital letter which we
   call U. Etymologically it is most related to v and u. See V,
   and U. Some of the uneducated classes in England, especially
   in London, confuse w and v, substituting the one for the
   other, as weal for veal, and veal for weal; wine for vine,
   and vine for wine, etc. See Guide to Pronunciation,
   [sect][sect] 266-268.
   [1913 Webster]
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