whiff


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Marysole \Ma"ry*sole\, n. [Mary, the proper name + sole the
   fish.] (Zool.)
   A large British fluke, or flounder (Rhombus megastoma); --
   called also carter, and whiff.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiff \Whiff\, v. i.
   To emit whiffs, as of smoke; to puff.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiff \Whiff\, n. [OE. weffe vapor, whiff, probably of imitative
   origin; cf. Dan. vift a puff, gust, W. chwiff a whiff, puff.]
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   1. A sudden expulsion of air from the mouth; a quick puff or
      slight gust, as of air or smoke.
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            But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword
            The unnerved father falls.            --Shak.
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            The skipper, he blew a whiff from his pipe,
            And a scornful laugh laughed he.      --Longfellow.
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   2. A glimpse; a hasty view. [Prov. Eng.]
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   3. (Zool.) The marysole, or sail fluke.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whiff \Whiff\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Whiffed; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Whiffing.]
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   1. To throw out in whiffs; to consume in whiffs; to puff.
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   2. To carry or convey by a whiff, or as by a whiff; to puff
      or blow away.
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            Old Empedocles, . . . who, when he leaped into Etna,
            having a dry, sear body, and light, the smoke took
            him, and whiffed him up into the moon. --B. Jonson.
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